Sharing out the misery

22 04 2009

A recent study by Keep Britain Working has found that many workers have responded to the threat of job cuts by proposing that their own pay and benefits should be cut in order to save the jobs of others.  While I have no idea how sound the methodology of this survey is it does chime with anecdotal evidence.  How can we understand this apparently altruistic response, for which one struggles to think of a historical precedent?

There is a positive element of solidarity in not wanting to see your colleagues lose their jobs.  Perhaps there is even the fear that if you accept the redundancies of others then you may well be next.  However, whilst in previous recessions there has been a similar and quite strong tendency to fight for the defence of jobs, in the past people simultaneously fought to defend wages.  One need only go back to the UK Miners’ Strike in the early 80s to see that.  During this period, workers tended to focus on forcing employers to not make redundancies, cut pay or close businesses.  It would seem then that the virtual elimination of organised labour as an effective force in society today plays a significant role in fuelling a widespread mood of acceptance that cuts have to be made somewhere for us all to survive.

The prevailing popular reaction to the recession in the UK has been passive acceptance with underlying anger, where the anger has been directed mainly at bankers or foreign workers.  Very little active hostility or organised resistance has been directed at the government or at employers.  This recession is increasingly being seen as the product of greed in the City and perhaps also greed in general.  In light of that, we can see how the willingness to take cuts in living standards is the flip side of this diagnosis, in the sense that people now feel that a period of austerity is a necessary antidote to the age of greed.

The unwillingness of people to fight for what is in their best interests, which for many of us means the maintenance or improvement of living standards, shows how low our self-expectations have become.  Current discussion about the public sector and possible cuts in public spending will now take place within this milieu of virtuous and necessary austerity and prudence, in no small part influenced by our modern-day preoccupations with what is good for the environment. 

Perhaps it is time to focus our efforts elsewhere and create a different agenda which puts development and growth at the centre of our discussions on the recession, the economy and the future.  Let us put our time to better use and quit trying to work out how best to share out the misery.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: