Democratic reform and the Titanic

1 06 2009
Asset bubbles + zombie political parties = ?

Asset bubbles + zombie political parties = ?

The news that the last survivor of the Titanic, Lillian Gertrud Asplund, has died reminds us that rearranging the deckchairs on that doomed vessel has since been a metaphor for wasting time on trivial things while disaster looms. The current discussion on democratic reform falls into that category. Whatever may or may not be the merits of proportional representation, the discussion about them at this point is almost entirely irrelevant to the real problems we face. The debacle over MPs’ expenses is partly the product of underlying anger about the recession, partly a response to politicians lecturing us about personal morality for years, and partly their own fault for making greed the official cause of the recession itself. These are all symptoms of a political crisis and not causes.

These contingent factors have precipitated a crisis in public confidence in the parties. But the bankruptcy of our political culture is the culmination of a long process of deterioration in politics, not the cause of it. The political parties have had their political blood drained away over the years: zombie parties propped up by bubbles in the economy

The problem of the emptiness of politics is not going to disappear simply because we vote for MPs in a different way. Neither is it right to see this crisis simply as a distraction from dealing with the economy, as the head of the CBI reminds us today. It is the crisis of politics that has led us into this recession and that has also caused the weak and vacillating response to it. The recession has exposed the problems for all to see and it is this public exposure that is now bringing down the political parties.

The second part of Sean Collins’ excellent essay on the difference between the 1930s Depression and today ends by making the point that the US President FD Roosevelt, whatever his failings, at least tried to attack the cause of the Depression in a bold and experimental way. This kind of openness to experimentation does not mean making Esther Rantzen an MP, it means throwing off many of the conservative ways of thinking and operating that have become part of our way of life.

add to del.icio.us Add to Blinkslist add to furl Digg it add to ma.gnolia Stumble It! add to simpy seed the vine TailRank post to facebook